Events Music Shows

New 24-hour venue to open in London

05/08/2018
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London is set to get a brand new 24-hour venue this month. FOLD will open its doors on 18th August for a huge opening party featuring some of London’s finest promoters and collectives.

The venue is the latest project to come from Shapes Collective, the team behind newly opened spaces like Hackney’s The Glove That Fits and Many Hands, Bermondsey. FOLD is located on an industrial site in east London between Canning Town and Star Lane.

The new club’s main room has a 600 person capacity and will have a strict no-photo policy. A second room is set to open in the space later in the year.

According to the venue’s co-founder Lasha Jorjoliani, AKA Voicedrone, 24 parties will tend to take place on Saturdays while Friday night events will run “till late”. Events held during the will be able to run until 3 am.

“FOLD presents an uncompromising schedule of forward-thinking electronic music,” says Jorjoliani in an official release from the venue. “Veering away from the regular four to the floor, we offer a smorgasbord of alien sounds from the unknown… “Expect extended set times, obscure b2bs and a generally more expansive pallet of sounds over the course of one event.”

“London, unlike other leading European cities such as Berlin or Amsterdam, has struggled in recent times.” adds fellow FOLD co-founder Seb Glover. “Gentrifying forces has put huge pressures on artists and musicians, with many leaving as a result. Licensed venues, which is where artists and DJs are predominantly able to earn their living have come under attack.”

“What we have created at FOLD is a new home, tucked away from the pressures of the city, a place where you can listen to extended sets on a tuned soundsystem tailored to the specifications of the room to maximise the experience of the space. We strive to do things differently in London, cultivating a more continental approach, creating a place where you can spend extended periods or coming and going as you please.”

The venue’s opening party takes place on 18th August and will feature a huge bill featuring contributions from of London’s most exciting promoters and curators as well the incredible Dimensions Soundsystem and Worldwide FM’s Global Roots Soundsystem. Other additions include Left Alone, Snap, Crackle & Pop, Body Motion and Make Me. Full details and tickets for the party are available here.

There is also the promise of upcoming label showcases parties with the mighty Ilian Tape, Clone and Pinkman are in the works.

FOLD champions an ethos of inclusivity with their official statement reading: “We welcome All Races. All Religions. All Genders. All Countries of Origin. All Sexual Orientations.. Our focus is creating a safe space that is disconnected from the intense pressures of London life, that allows freedom of expression, positivity and inspiration to take form.”

As well as being a venue, FOLD offers five purpose-built studios which artists will be able to hire “by appointment of the FOLD crew.”.

This announcement comes as a refreshing burst of good news just weeks after members of east London’s Hackney council voted unanimously for a policy which rules that all new pubs, clubs and venues will be required to adhere to a strict curfew of 11 PM on weekdays and 12 AM on weekends. That decision has, naturally, been met with huge criticism and protest.

Events Music

Step inside Giorgia Angiuli’s weird and wonderful live show

05/08/2018
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Giorgia Angiuli is one of the most distinctive performers in electronic music, coupling quirky toys and powerful synths with her own voice and dynamic performance. We spoke to her about how the show evolved, the realities behind performing live in the club, and the Es Vedra performance…

Why did you put together a live show instead of DJing?
“I’ve never played as a DJ. I had a classical education, I studied guitar and I grew up in a family of musicians, then I started to play in different bands, different genres: nu metal, indie, electronic, folk — I like many kinds of music and I started to play melodic techno music just four years ago. I have always been fascinated by music composition and I like to play different instruments, so for these reasons the live set is the perfect way to express myself.”

How did your set-up start and how has it evolved?
“I like to change my set-up often — I love to use different equipment. Since the beginning I’ve used Ableton Live, and the other instruments changed. A few years ago I used to play with my guitar and I’ve always used my voice more as a musical instrument, singing only a few parts. Then I added different MIDI controllers, synths and toys for kids.
“Travelling a lot, I always consider the problem of the weight of my luggage — that’s why I need to look for cool, reliable and small gear. Now I’m playing with Apogee soundcard, Ableton Live, an SM58 microphone, Arturia Minilab mk2, Novation Launchkey, Moog Sub37, Yamaha CS01, TC Helicon Voice Live and a few other bits and pieces.”

How does your live show work now? What are the main bits of kit?
“During my live set I never play the tracks that I release using the same arrangements, I prefer to play them with different arrangements, keeping only a few elements from the original version. I pre-record basslines, kicks and main grooves in my studio and I add some parts live with the other instruments. I loop some groove elements live — ride, percussions, snare — on top of my voice, the synths and the toys.”

You incorporate vocals into your sets — why is it important to you to keep things organic and keep the human element in the music?
“Yes, I love the human touch, but I use my voice as a musical instrument, with effects and singing only in small parts [of the live show]. Also, I’m not a big fan of quantisation and I work on the live set in a very different way compared to how I produce my tracks. I like to add dirty elements to my live set and I really don’t care about the perfect mix, because it’s live. But, on the other hand, when I produce a track I take care of all the details and I prefer to keep the composition more clean and organic.”

“I like to add dirty elements to my live set and I really don’t care about the perfect mix, because it’s live”

What are the main challenges of playing live in a club?
“Unfortunately live sets are still rare in the clubs — too often the space on stage is really small, because the clubs are designed for DJs. You can find sound technicians that don’t read carefully the technical riders. But I still love to perform live in the clubs, the reaction of the crowd is immediate — if they dance or they close their eyes it means that they are appreciating your show, and I love when this magic connection between me and the crowd happens.”

You performed live at Es Vedra with Cercle. How was that experience?
“It was my first time at Es Vedra and, to be honest, when I arrived there I felt a bit scared because I suffer from vertigo. Then I started to play and I felt at one with the blue of the sea, the power of nature was really strong. I think it could be amazing to organise more events in these kinds of locations: the energy is so strong. It was a unique experience, and I have to say a big thanks to the channel Cercle for inviting me there, they are doing an awesome job.”

What advice would you give to someone who was thinking of starting a live electronic music show?
“I think the most important thing if one wants to start this career is to study a little bit of music theory, in order to be able to improvise during the set, and to practice many hours a day. This will allow you to express a human touch in the show, not only using machines or a laptop. There are also difficulties, for example travelling around the world with heavy equipment and luggage, and the sound-check will be an essential step. Also, packing your equipment after the performance will take a long time but hey, at the end you will get huge satisfaction and emotion from playing your own music in front of the crowd!”

*Catch Giorgia playing alongside Maceo Plex, Mind Against and Popof for Pyramid at Amnesia on 20th of August.

Festival Music Music Festivals

Houghton Festival completes 2018 lineup with Helena Hauff, Mulatu Astatke, Antal

09/07/2018
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Horror Inc., Hunee, DJ Sotofett have also just been added to the Norfolk event.

The lineup for the second edition of Houghton Festival has been finalised.

Curated by Craig Richards and produced by Gottwood Festival, Houghton expands its roster of artists to feature Helena Hauff, Hunee, DJ Sotofett, Tama Sumo, Willow, Move D, Andy Blake, Binh and Akufen as Horror Inc. Live performances will include Mulatu Astake with Khruangbin, Red Axes, Dan Beaumont, Doc Scott, Billy Nasty, The Mole and Begin, with a live debut from Lost Souls of Saturn.

Brilliant Corners and Analogue Foundation’s travelling soundsystem Giant Steps will also return to the festival, presenting Donna Leake, Claude Douset, Pol Vallo, the Dalston spot’s owners Amit and Aneesh Patel and more.

Ricardo Villalobos, Andrew Weatherall, Margaret Dygas and Vladimir Ivkovic were included in the first round of artists performing at Houghton this summer, announced back in January. The art and sculpture programme is still TBA. The festival will take place from August 9th to 12th at Houghton Hall. Tickets are sold out.

See all the new additions below.

Events Music

Martin Garrix announces 2018 world tour

09/07/2018
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Martin Garrix has announced details of his summer tour for 2018, which kicked off yesterday. The critically-acclaimed DJ is playing until the end of August on a tour that will see him playing a total of 36 shows in just 57 days.

Tickets are currently on sale here.

Given how busy Garrix has been over the last few years, many are amazed that he’s been able to get a tour together – particularly without a focus single, EP, or album to hone in on. Much of the tour is based in Europe, where Garrix will be heading to Ibiza in Spain, as well as cities in Hungary, Norway and Malta. He will also be performing sets in Las Vegas and Canada.

Back in June, Garrix shared ‘Oceans’ his eagerly awaited collab with Khalid.

DjMag

Music Skye News

We are proud to announce the launching of our new Skye Energy Radio App / Apple Store / Play Store

03/07/2018
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We are proud to announce the launching of our new Skye Energy Radio App.
Within our Skye Energy Radio mobile app we’ve launched a music discovery and recommendation tool that covers all of dance.
Listen to the audio you love and let the moments move you.

Download from the App Store: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/skye-energy-radio/id1404906277?mt=8
Soon On Google Play Store: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.iosresonce.skyeradio

App Information
Size 9.6 MB
Category : Music
Compatibility :Requires iOS 8.0 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.
Languages: English

Music

Tomorrowland tickets have started to arrive in this year’s treasure chest

30/06/2018
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Tomorrowland tickets have started to arrive in this year’s treasure chest, themed around 2018’s The Story of Planaxis.

Each year the festival sends tickets out in an elaborate package that contains themed goodies. You can see this year’s ticket treasure chest below.

The festival, which runs across two weekends in Boom, Belgium, from 20th to 22nd and 27th to 29th July, announced this year’s theme last October and shared further details of the concept with a lush looking video earlier this month (June).

Earlier this week (25th June), Tomorrowland creative director Christophe Van den Branden revealed that the festival is set to look “totally different” this year.

Check out the Tomorrowland 2018 ticket treasure chest below.

Tomorrowland Tickets

Music

Deadmau5‘s orchestral album ‘Where’s the Drop?’ is given full release

30/06/2018
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Deadmau5‘s orchestral album ‘Where’s the Drop?’ is now available everywhere following a period of Tidal exclusivity. You can listen to it below.

The mau5trap boss – real name Joel Zimmerman – releases ‘Where’s the Drop’ after months of teaserssnippets and previews.

Zimmerman also landed the No. 49 slot in our DJ Mag Top 100 DJs Poll last year.

Listen to Deadmau5’s ‘Where’s the Drop?’ below.

Music

Nicky Romero reveals he has “two folders full” of unreleased Avicii material

30/06/2018
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Nicky Romero has revealed that he has “two folders full” of unreleased Avicii material in a new interview.

Speaking to Ultra Singapore, Romero also explained that he may never release the music out of respect for the late EDM megastar.

“I don’t know if it morally feels right to me to work on songs that the original composer has not approved,” Romero told Ultra Singapore.

“I know that Avicii was really a perfectionist, and I kind of feel bad if I put something out not knowing if he wants to put it out. So that’s kind of what holds me back, out of respect for him.”

Romero paid tribute to Avicii at Ultra Singapore earlier this month (June) by playing the late EDM superstar’s unreleased Chris Martin collaboration, ‘Heaven’.

Tiësto also paid tribute to Avicii with 12-minute megamix live from EDC Las Vegas last month (May), whilst Pete Tong gave an opening address at International Music Summit (IMS) Ibiza in memory of Avicii.

Avicii was found dead in his hotel room in Oman last month (20th April) with his family releasing a statement implying he had taken his own life. He was 28 years old.

Since then, tributes for Avicii have poured in from fellow DJs, friends and fans with Nile Rodgers saying he was “one of the best, if not the best” producer he’s ever worked with. Last weekend at EDC Las Vegas Tiësto paid tribute to Avicii by playing a 12-minute megamix of some of his biggest hits.

Read DJ Mag’s obituary for Avicii here and watch the full Nicky Romero interview at Ultra Singapore below.

Events Festival Music Shows

David Guetta and Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike announce Two Is One Collaboration for AMF

28/06/2018
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David Guetta and Dimitri Vegas & Like Mike have been announced as this year’s Two Is One performers at Amsterdam Music Festival (AMF).

The Two Is One concept was launched at AMF 2017, as Hardwell and Armin Van Buuren joined forces for an exclusive dual performance. This year’s pairing, which sees two former Top 100 DJs winners join forces for the first time, will be eagerly anticipated by fans of both artists.

AMF takes place on Saturday 20th October at the Johan Cruijff ArenA in Amsterdam. As the flagship event of ADE, the one day showcase features stadium-sized performances from the world’s biggest DJs and culminates with the Top 100 DJs Awards Ceremony in front of an audience of 35,000 dance music fans.

This year’s event also features the launch of the AMF Hotel (located at Corendon Village Hotel Amsterdam). The AMF hotel is said to be an exclusive space where fans from 108 countries who visit AMF can hang out before, during and after the show.

The full line up will be announced shortly. Early bird tickets are available now from amf-festival.com..

Music

Streaming is coming to the booth: here’s how it will change DJing forever

28/06/2018
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Soon DJs will be able to stream millions of tracks directly to their software and hardware. DJ Mag explores the impact on DJing tech, creativity and culture…

Imagine the scenario – you walk into the booth with nothing more than a pair of headphones, login with your username and password to the always-connected CDJ and your whole music library, playlists, cue points and every track ever released on Beatport is at your fingertips, immediately recalled from the cloud and ready to play within seconds. No USB sticks, no SD cards, just a username and password and an unlimited supply of records.

It’s not a fanciful vision of the future – Beatport have already announced that users will soon be able to stream their catalogue directly into “leading” DJ software “from 2019”, though no details have yet been released. Their acquisition of cloud and storage service Pulselocker earlier this year – a platform that was seemingly too ahead of its time to succeed – paved the way for what will inevitably become the norm in DJ equipment and software of the future. Beatport won’t be the first to provide streaming into apps though – Spotify has been part of Algoriddim’s djay and a few other software and iOS apps for a while – but they’re the first pro-DJ-focussed platform to hint at it, which means it’s time to take it seriously.

Native Instruments have also announced that Traktor has been redesigned “from the ground up”, with the new wares expected to be shown later in the year. Although they didn’t initially adopt Pulselocker – Serato, rekordbox and Virtual DJ all did – with a re-design from scratch and their iOS platform already syncing cue points, BPM, key and hotcues with iCloud Drive, surely NI will join the party soon.

No specific announcements around hardware have been made but given the rapid development of Pioneer DJ’s whole range, as well as Denon’s forward-thinking SC5000 and the way in which both are influenced by their software counterparts, it’s by no means a leap to suggest the next versions of both will incorporate some aspect of streaming, even if it’s initially just cloud analysis.

The pros and cons are wildly diverse and their impact on DJing is huge, on both sides of the coin. The first and most obvious point being stability.

STRONG AND STABLE
The idea of a track losing connection and dropping out in the middle of a packed dancefloor is enough to deter any self-respecting DJ – it took years of crashing laptops and embarrassing moments before computers and their software became stable enough to be trusted in the booth. Even then, a huge number of DJs looked (and still look) at them with suspicion.

Since then, the laptop has gone out of favour as a DJ tool, with the industry standard CDJ-2000nxs2s now offering all the playlisting, analytics, searching and portability that made laptops so appealing in the first place. Will Pioneer DJ really risk their reputation for stability, one they’ve been building since the original CDJs were introduced in 1994 and one that tops the priority list for most professional DJs? Stability has dictated how almost all industry standards came to pass with the Technic SL-1200/1210, CDJs themselves and software like Serato and Traktor all making it a fundamental priority, and sticking around in the process.

Of course, the way in which the technology is implemented will dictate that stability – it’s unlikely the tracks will stream in real-time and more probably will cache on loading, the same way they do when played from a USB stick, SD card or CD. Fail-safes like emergency loop will still stand, with a few others likely implemented. However, as you’re only ever one high-profile crash or dropout away from setting the concepts back years, it’s got to be the highest priority for everyone involved. Inner-city internet might be strong enough to stream a lossless file in real-time, but dessert festivals or small-town clubs and bars might not be so advanced.

RECLAIMING ROYALTIES
One positive outcome of our new streaming overlords is the detail and accuracy of royalty reporting. It’s an open secret that producers are not being accurately paid. Exact numbers are hard to come by but the Association for Electronic Music has earmarked £100m they feel needs to be correctly allocated.

That’s a lot of money the independent music landscape is not seeing, though technologies like Pioneer DJ’s KUVO box are working hard to tackle the issue. With cloud-connected DJing hardware and software, every single track played in any club around the world can be registered and assigned to the right producer automatically and in real-time. This information could also fuel analytics, showing artists and producers what DJ is playing their music and in what part of the world it’s most popular on the dancefloor – invaluable metrics for booking agents and labels.

As always with automated royalty technology, there’ll no doubt be gaming issues, similar to what we’ve seen on Spotify but surely it’s a step in the right direction to begin to right the wrong that’s been plaguing dance music for 25 years? Just in case streaming wasn’t enough of a contentious point already, this type of royalty accounting and tracking will no doubt turn heads of those who despise track ID culture and long to keep their music to themselves. Regardless of what side you’re on, it will be interesting to see that discussion evolve.

INFINITY AND BEYOND
Another aspect to the always-connected booth is more of a personal, creative and cultural one. What would it do for you as a DJ to have access to everything, all the time? We’ve seen the rise of analogue hardware in the studio, and the resurgence of vinyl for DJs partly off the back of the fact that creativity thrives when we limit our options.

Of course, this is a personal thing and there’ll be plenty of DJs who would jump at the chance to have a million-plus tracks to choose from – it was exactly that that partly triggered the growth of digital formats. For those who regularly play smaller bars, weddings or multiple genres night-to-night, it’s particularly appealing to have everything at your fingertips – as long as the crowd don’t find out.

For everyone else though, it’s hard to argue it’d be more challenging, creative or rewarding. The happy accident – so often the catalyst behind great ideas – could see itself replaced by the predictable and the easy. You could argue opening up millions of tracks to DJs would surely bring about more versatile, esoteric sets, void of genre, but on the flipside, unless we’re happy to go back to squinted at screens, franticly searching and RSI-inducing scrolling, it’s likely DJs will simply embrace what’s presented to them at the top level. From Beatport’s perspective, that could be charts, banners and promotions, selling us music right into our mixers.

We’re not suggesting any DJ is going to play something they’ve never heard before simply because it’s in a chart on their CDJ, but it’s nothing new to suggest when presented with everything, we often choose the most familiar path. How many times have you found yourself playing the same tracks over and over, despite having thousands on your stick or laptop? If it’s the abundance of choice that’s overwhleming, expect streaming to add to that ten-fold, and therefore encourage ubiquity further.

FULL STREAM AHEAD
Disclaimer: This article is pure speculation based on trends and technologies that have and continue to emerge over the past few years. DJing is notoriously slow to adopt new tech across the board – the basic concepts the majority of DJs employ every weekend are only a small step ahead of those that were implemented at the dawn of the art. With something as drastic as streaming, it won’t change things overnight. More likely, we’ll see incremental differences, starting with cloud analysis, cuepoints storage and custom notes and information. Even Beatport’s announcement – as forward thinking as it seems now – mentions nothing of file format, sound quality or cost, all of which could deter large groups of DJs.

But there are real benefits and real challenges ahead for the user and the tech companies who create the tools. It’s clear streaming is going to make its way into the booth eventually and when it does, expect it to split the camp the same way the first laptops in the booth did. Either way, like those laptops, it will change the DJing landscape for good.