Events Music

Adam Beyer announces Drumcode Halloween after-party

12/10/2018
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Adam Beyer has announced an after-party for Drumcode’s forthcoming Halloween session at London’s Tobacco Dock on Saturday 27th October.

With the main event finishing up at 10PM, those who’ve still got something left to give can head to one of the UK capital’s newest venues, the 24-hour-licensed FOLD, for another few rounds with the main man and his comrades through to 6AM.

Alongside the imprint bossman, techno big guns Nicole Moudaber, Charlotte de Witte, Slam, Paco Osuna, Alan Fitzpatrick, Dense & Pika and Marco Faraone are all down to play the daytime. So far no line-up has been confirmed for the afters, so watch this space for details as they arrive.

DjMAG Article

Music

Deadmau5 releases statement confirming indefinite hiatus

12/10/2018
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Deadmau5 has released a statement saying that he is to take time out of the spotlight.

Posting on Twitter earlier today, the producer wrote: “This has been a very difficult period and I sincerely apologize for my comments which were completely offensive and I take full responsibility for.”He continues: “Now it’s time for me to deal with my own personal issues including finally addressing my own mental health challenges that I have wrestled with for the past several years.”Admitting that he has fallen short of his goal to “uplift my community,” he says that after consulting with friends and family, he has decided that he should seek professional help to deal with his problems.“Again I apologize to all of those I have offended and I will be going off the radar and taking the time necessary to work on myself.”The move comes after the producer faced wide criticism for now-deleted tweets of a homophobic and transphobic nature, while he also made ableist remarks about the music of producer Slushii.

You can see his full apology below.

pic.twitter.com/acblerG5xF

DjMAG Article

Events Music

Fabric to relaunch Room Three with huge new soundsystem

04/09/2018
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Fabric is set to relaunch Room Three with a huge new soundsystem, it has been confirmed.

News that the dancefloor would be brought back into action first hit over summer, having been shut since the club re-opened following its temporary closure in 2016. The longstanding FABRICLIVE sessions— which lent their name to the mix series that’s just about to finish— will be the first to make use of the space, on Friday 14th September, meaning it will be available for the marathon 30-hour 19th Birthday in October.

Dancers are promised a relocated booth, adding greater intimacy, and new Pioneer rig, with the focus on showcasing rising UK talent. Tumble Audio will put the setup through its paces on the debut night, before 3000 Bass (featuring The Marcus Nasty Show), Addictive Behaviour, Then & Now and She Said So step up in the weeks that follow, making this another significant milestone to add to our list of 10 moments that defined Fabric.

Music

Is dance music suffering from a crisis of competence?

04/09/2018
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The kick-drum drops out, reach towards the ceiling, the air is filled with whoops and whistles. Then a long whoosh of white noise simultaneously builds the tension whilst signalling the fact that the kick and b-line are about to drop. When they do, everyone is briefly animated for a minute, but then the energy in the room starts to flag — but don’t worry, because they’ll be another near-identical breakdown in about thirty seconds where we can all do it again.

The idea that dance music is in some kind of creative crisis has become more popular in the last few years. There is a lot more music being produced and released than ever before, and if we’re honest, not all of it is destined to become classic. Instead, we have seen a growth in competent, reasonably well-produced but utterly beige, boring music.
Every week, there are hundreds of tracks released that sound as though they’ve been put together quickly, with little thought or creativity, and by the sound of it with no struggle, pain or emotion. Based on templates, sample packs and presets, the hi-hats, snares and claps are always in the same place, the same bass sounds are endlessly recycled and the parts are set out into virtually identical arrangements.

These tunes get knocked out and then polished and preened through high-quality plugins to sound big, fat and shiny. They might get sent off for professional mastering for a final prettification, but they’re still empty. It’s all surface sheen with no emotional depth — it’s merely competent: the kick and bassline EQ’d together nicely, all the parts sitting neatly in separate areas of the frequency section, just like producers are taught to do.

But the question surely has to be: who wants competent art? Surely we should demand art that is bone-marrow-meltingly good, music that burns its way deep into our souls, never to be forgotten.

This glut of competent music is the result of several factors — the lowering of access to production is obviously a big one, as is the ongoing improvement of Digital Audio Workstations like Ableton and Logic. The increase in quality of sample packs might be cited too, as might the change in the cultural perception of the DJ. The frighteningly quick turnover of new releases makes some producers feel that they have to keep churning out a few EPs every month — and inevitably this has to affect quality. But there is also a larger cultural malaise, and it’s the result of living in a society where every release/remix/DJ gig/statement/ move is instantly available for judgement, outside of its original context, on social media.

Fear is a terrible thing; its ripples wash over people far away from its initial source. Fear of the new, of stepping outside the production comfort zone, of producing something vastly different to what’s currently ‘big’, fear that one’s ‘profile’ might fade if a frantic release schedule isn’t maintained. These have all influenced many producers and have subtly changed our dance music culture. And these fears directly affect the quality of the club-nights we go to — be it DJs making safe boring tune selections or producers releasing safe, competent music.

Prior to the digitisation of the music and media industries, if a producer or artist made a shit album they would get completely slated, but the only people who read the reviews would be the people who bought the music magazines. Now the rare sighting of a searing review is spread far and wide. Wrenched from its original context, criticism is re-branded as ‘hating’ — as though having a strong opinion on music is hate. It isn’t. It’s the opposite, it’s love — love for brilliant, awe-inspiring music. A negative review is the result of a deep passion for the kind of tracks that create life-lasting memories, over just another competent utterly lifeless production.

We are in danger of accepting a new standard in music, that of competency. It’s the artists’ job to kick back against this process. Competent dance music promotes the ideals of simplicity, of playing-it-safe, and celebrates banality over invention. In these troubled times, with the rise of the far-right, and bearing in mind the roots of house music in black, Latino and gay American subculture, kicking back against this trend becomes a moral imperative. Because music that is fresh and challenging, music with depth and real emotion, music which consists of more than a few generic sample loops strung together, that’s the kind of music that can engender community and encourage critical thought; and critical thought is the single biggest threat to creeping authoritarianism.

In short, all of us — producers, labels, DJs, even reviewers — need to be a lot fucking braver.

Dj Mag

Music

Paul van Dyk announces special Printworks album launch show

14/08/2018
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Paul van Dyk has announced the release of his new studio album, ‘Symbols’.

Set to drop this autumn, the new LP follows his celebrated 2017 release ‘From Then On’ and will be launched with a special headline show at London’s Printworks on 12th October.

Earlier this month, PVD teased the new album with a mysterious tweet. ‘Symbols’ will be the ninth LP from the trance legend who released his debut ‘45 RPM’ in 1994.

In an official statement, van Dyk said, “‘Symbols’ is an album deeply rooted in story-telling, mystery and adventure. It’s an exploration of trance, a journey through the breadth and depth of a genre that continues to enthrall me as an artist.”

‘Symbols’ will be debuted in London’s incredible Printworks venue on 12th October. The recent DJ Mag North America cover star will be the first trance DJ to headline the massive venue since it opened in February 2017.

In July, van Dyk also released the eponymous track from his 2018 SHINE Ibiza residency.

Recently, the German trance luminary took to Twitter to remind fans just how much trance still means to him after nearly three decades in the game. “Trance is more than music,” he wrote. “It’s a lifestyle. It’s about community. It’s emotions turned into sound.”

Skye News

Skye Energy Drink USA proud to announce partnership with the Philadelphia Union Men’s Professional Soccer Club

10/08/2018
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It is with great pleasure that Skye Energy Drink USA announces that we are now a Proud Partner with the Philadelphia Union Men’s Professional Soccer Club. We have long anticipated working with a MLS team with this stature and our alliance will be a big step in expanding our footprint. The endeavor also allows us to work with Spectra Food Services and Hospitality, a leading provider in the US. Stadiums and arenas. Our products will be available at concession stands throughout the Talen Energy Stadium.

Skye Energy Drinks began in Europe in 2012 with the concept of offering the first non-cloned energy drink to the market. We have succeeded wit our pleasant tasting, Sky Blue color and vitamin enriched formula. Contact Skye at sales@pureproductz.com for more details.

Events Music Shows

New 24-hour venue to open in London

05/08/2018
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London is set to get a brand new 24-hour venue this month. FOLD will open its doors on 18th August for a huge opening party featuring some of London’s finest promoters and collectives.

The venue is the latest project to come from Shapes Collective, the team behind newly opened spaces like Hackney’s The Glove That Fits and Many Hands, Bermondsey. FOLD is located on an industrial site in east London between Canning Town and Star Lane.

The new club’s main room has a 600 person capacity and will have a strict no-photo policy. A second room is set to open in the space later in the year.

According to the venue’s co-founder Lasha Jorjoliani, AKA Voicedrone, 24 parties will tend to take place on Saturdays while Friday night events will run “till late”. Events held during the will be able to run until 3 am.

“FOLD presents an uncompromising schedule of forward-thinking electronic music,” says Jorjoliani in an official release from the venue. “Veering away from the regular four to the floor, we offer a smorgasbord of alien sounds from the unknown… “Expect extended set times, obscure b2bs and a generally more expansive pallet of sounds over the course of one event.”

“London, unlike other leading European cities such as Berlin or Amsterdam, has struggled in recent times.” adds fellow FOLD co-founder Seb Glover. “Gentrifying forces has put huge pressures on artists and musicians, with many leaving as a result. Licensed venues, which is where artists and DJs are predominantly able to earn their living have come under attack.”

“What we have created at FOLD is a new home, tucked away from the pressures of the city, a place where you can listen to extended sets on a tuned soundsystem tailored to the specifications of the room to maximise the experience of the space. We strive to do things differently in London, cultivating a more continental approach, creating a place where you can spend extended periods or coming and going as you please.”

The venue’s opening party takes place on 18th August and will feature a huge bill featuring contributions from of London’s most exciting promoters and curators as well the incredible Dimensions Soundsystem and Worldwide FM’s Global Roots Soundsystem. Other additions include Left Alone, Snap, Crackle & Pop, Body Motion and Make Me. Full details and tickets for the party are available here.

There is also the promise of upcoming label showcases parties with the mighty Ilian Tape, Clone and Pinkman are in the works.

FOLD champions an ethos of inclusivity with their official statement reading: “We welcome All Races. All Religions. All Genders. All Countries of Origin. All Sexual Orientations.. Our focus is creating a safe space that is disconnected from the intense pressures of London life, that allows freedom of expression, positivity and inspiration to take form.”

As well as being a venue, FOLD offers five purpose-built studios which artists will be able to hire “by appointment of the FOLD crew.”.

This announcement comes as a refreshing burst of good news just weeks after members of east London’s Hackney council voted unanimously for a policy which rules that all new pubs, clubs and venues will be required to adhere to a strict curfew of 11 PM on weekdays and 12 AM on weekends. That decision has, naturally, been met with huge criticism and protest.

Events Music

Step inside Giorgia Angiuli’s weird and wonderful live show

05/08/2018
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Giorgia Angiuli is one of the most distinctive performers in electronic music, coupling quirky toys and powerful synths with her own voice and dynamic performance. We spoke to her about how the show evolved, the realities behind performing live in the club, and the Es Vedra performance…

Why did you put together a live show instead of DJing?
“I’ve never played as a DJ. I had a classical education, I studied guitar and I grew up in a family of musicians, then I started to play in different bands, different genres: nu metal, indie, electronic, folk — I like many kinds of music and I started to play melodic techno music just four years ago. I have always been fascinated by music composition and I like to play different instruments, so for these reasons the live set is the perfect way to express myself.”

How did your set-up start and how has it evolved?
“I like to change my set-up often — I love to use different equipment. Since the beginning I’ve used Ableton Live, and the other instruments changed. A few years ago I used to play with my guitar and I’ve always used my voice more as a musical instrument, singing only a few parts. Then I added different MIDI controllers, synths and toys for kids.
“Travelling a lot, I always consider the problem of the weight of my luggage — that’s why I need to look for cool, reliable and small gear. Now I’m playing with Apogee soundcard, Ableton Live, an SM58 microphone, Arturia Minilab mk2, Novation Launchkey, Moog Sub37, Yamaha CS01, TC Helicon Voice Live and a few other bits and pieces.”

How does your live show work now? What are the main bits of kit?
“During my live set I never play the tracks that I release using the same arrangements, I prefer to play them with different arrangements, keeping only a few elements from the original version. I pre-record basslines, kicks and main grooves in my studio and I add some parts live with the other instruments. I loop some groove elements live — ride, percussions, snare — on top of my voice, the synths and the toys.”

You incorporate vocals into your sets — why is it important to you to keep things organic and keep the human element in the music?
“Yes, I love the human touch, but I use my voice as a musical instrument, with effects and singing only in small parts [of the live show]. Also, I’m not a big fan of quantisation and I work on the live set in a very different way compared to how I produce my tracks. I like to add dirty elements to my live set and I really don’t care about the perfect mix, because it’s live. But, on the other hand, when I produce a track I take care of all the details and I prefer to keep the composition more clean and organic.”

“I like to add dirty elements to my live set and I really don’t care about the perfect mix, because it’s live”

What are the main challenges of playing live in a club?
“Unfortunately live sets are still rare in the clubs — too often the space on stage is really small, because the clubs are designed for DJs. You can find sound technicians that don’t read carefully the technical riders. But I still love to perform live in the clubs, the reaction of the crowd is immediate — if they dance or they close their eyes it means that they are appreciating your show, and I love when this magic connection between me and the crowd happens.”

You performed live at Es Vedra with Cercle. How was that experience?
“It was my first time at Es Vedra and, to be honest, when I arrived there I felt a bit scared because I suffer from vertigo. Then I started to play and I felt at one with the blue of the sea, the power of nature was really strong. I think it could be amazing to organise more events in these kinds of locations: the energy is so strong. It was a unique experience, and I have to say a big thanks to the channel Cercle for inviting me there, they are doing an awesome job.”

What advice would you give to someone who was thinking of starting a live electronic music show?
“I think the most important thing if one wants to start this career is to study a little bit of music theory, in order to be able to improvise during the set, and to practice many hours a day. This will allow you to express a human touch in the show, not only using machines or a laptop. There are also difficulties, for example travelling around the world with heavy equipment and luggage, and the sound-check will be an essential step. Also, packing your equipment after the performance will take a long time but hey, at the end you will get huge satisfaction and emotion from playing your own music in front of the crowd!”

*Catch Giorgia playing alongside Maceo Plex, Mind Against and Popof for Pyramid at Amnesia on 20th of August.

Festival Music Music Festivals

Houghton Festival completes 2018 lineup with Helena Hauff, Mulatu Astatke, Antal

09/07/2018
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Horror Inc., Hunee, DJ Sotofett have also just been added to the Norfolk event.

The lineup for the second edition of Houghton Festival has been finalised.

Curated by Craig Richards and produced by Gottwood Festival, Houghton expands its roster of artists to feature Helena Hauff, Hunee, DJ Sotofett, Tama Sumo, Willow, Move D, Andy Blake, Binh and Akufen as Horror Inc. Live performances will include Mulatu Astake with Khruangbin, Red Axes, Dan Beaumont, Doc Scott, Billy Nasty, The Mole and Begin, with a live debut from Lost Souls of Saturn.

Brilliant Corners and Analogue Foundation’s travelling soundsystem Giant Steps will also return to the festival, presenting Donna Leake, Claude Douset, Pol Vallo, the Dalston spot’s owners Amit and Aneesh Patel and more.

Ricardo Villalobos, Andrew Weatherall, Margaret Dygas and Vladimir Ivkovic were included in the first round of artists performing at Houghton this summer, announced back in January. The art and sculpture programme is still TBA. The festival will take place from August 9th to 12th at Houghton Hall. Tickets are sold out.

See all the new additions below.

Events Music

Martin Garrix announces 2018 world tour

09/07/2018
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Martin Garrix has announced details of his summer tour for 2018, which kicked off yesterday. The critically-acclaimed DJ is playing until the end of August on a tour that will see him playing a total of 36 shows in just 57 days.

Tickets are currently on sale here.

Given how busy Garrix has been over the last few years, many are amazed that he’s been able to get a tour together – particularly without a focus single, EP, or album to hone in on. Much of the tour is based in Europe, where Garrix will be heading to Ibiza in Spain, as well as cities in Hungary, Norway and Malta. He will also be performing sets in Las Vegas and Canada.

Back in June, Garrix shared ‘Oceans’ his eagerly awaited collab with Khalid.

DjMag