Events Festival Music Festivals

Swedish House Mafia tease 2019 tour dates

31/05/2018
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Swedish House Mafia look set to be going on tour next year after Axwell ^ Ingrosso teased fans at a show in New York City’s Brooklyn Mirage on Memorial Day (28th May)

Toward the end of the set the pair, who form two thirds of Swedish House Mafia, stopped the music and announced that there are indeed gigs lined up for the trio next week.

As can be heard in the video shared below, Axwell said to the crowd, “What do we do now? This is a big move. This has never happened before.  Should we cancel the Swedish House Mafia gig we’re planning next year? We are not sure they are ready for Swedish House Mafia in 2019.”

The duo went on to play SHM’s hit ‘Don’t You Worry Child’ as one of the set’s closing tracks while a banner with the trio’s name on it appeared on screen.

Of course, the Swedish House Mafia reformation rumour mill has been up and running for months now. After months of speculation , hints and teasers, the trio reunited at Ultra Music Festival in Miami back in March, claiming, “we’re Swedish House Mafia for good this time”.

Since, the rumours have continued as Axtone Records teased new material from the trio and their social media profile was cleared, suggesting an imminent tour.

With Axwell’s statement the other night though, the rumours do seem to have some truth to them with the possibility of a tour seeming all but confirmed.

Music

Het Magazijn is hosting a marathon 36-hour techno and electro rave this summer

29/05/2018
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Het Magazijn is hosting a marathon 36-hour techno and electro rave this summer to mark its one year anniversary, kicking off on Friday 6th July and running through the following day.

The club, located in the regal capital of the Netherlands, The Hague, is marking 12 months by doing what it does best, and while plans fall short of the ridiculous 87-hour session in Berlin we reported on last month, they still sound impressive. In addition to the usual 150-capacity, Funktion One-equipped and 24-licensed Dutch venue, a roof terrace and additional areas will also be used.

“We will throw an extended party with more than 36 hours of music, among different rooms of the Bleyenberg building, yielding plenty of time to reflect on and celebrate the past year,” the club said in a statement on Facebook.

The line-up is yet to be confirmed, with District25, ‘advocates of the Hague night culture’, partnering on the party. That’s the crew behind Dutch festival The Crave, which this year welcomes Skee Mask, Aurora Halal, Blawan and DJ Stingray, so expect serious stuff. Not least as Het Magazijn has itself set a high standard with guests such as Matrixxman, Tijana T and Anthony Parasole in its first 12 months.

 

Festival Music Music Festivals

Nina Kraviz is playing a 24-hour rave in Berlin in June

29/05/2018
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Nina Kraviz has joined the bill for Arma x Funkhaus’s 24 hour party in Berlin on 2nd June.

As part of revered Moscow techno collective Arma 17’s tenth birthday celebrations, the inimitable techno DJ/producer/label boss will join the likes of electro-acoustic legends Ambiq, industrial drone duo Zoviet France and Salford noise rockers Gnod.

The 24-hour party takes place in the iconic East Berlin venue, Funkhaus. Also featuring on the bill are Petre Insperiscu, Nastia and Etapp Kyle. Take a look at the full line-up here.

The official statement from the event describes it as follows: “From the impressive opening concerts to the long and winding dancefloors, the scope of Arma X feels more akin to a festival than a one-off event. It’s the embodiment of Arma’s vision, as expressed over the past ten years through events in Russia and elsewhere, now manifested in a unique space loaded with history.”

It’s been a difficult time for underground pioneers Arma 17. A fire destroyed its first location in Moscow and members were subjected to ongoing harassment by authorities. When their 2016 Outline Festival was forced to shut down by police, the organisers announced “a de facto state of an international phenomenon”. They have continued to host parties all over the world since, releasing left-of-centre music via their record label. The event series/club rose eight positions in this year’s DJ Mag Top 100 clubs poll.

Music

Can electronic music make you ill?

18/05/2018
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With mental health and wellbeing one of the principal keynote topics at the International Music Summit (IMS) in Ibiza at the end of this month (May), we asked the Association For Electronic Music (AFEM)’s working group Protect Mental & Physical Health For Fans & Professionals to interview some industry stalwarts about their mental health experiences and how they’ve coped. Read on for some expert advice on how you can maximise your wellbeing when things get tough…

Flying high in the music industry can seem idyllic, but is there a price to pay? Coupled with the perceived glamour is a 24/7 lifestyle with long unsociable hours, sleepless nights, relentless work and travel; always being switched on for the Orwellian eye of social media; plus easy access to a host of chemical sedations to escape it all. It’s enough to take a toll on even the most balanced of minds.

A study produced by leading music charity Help Musicians UK showed that those working in music are on average three times more likely to be affected by anxiety and depression compared to the general public. Be you a headline DJ, major league manager or just starting out, mental health issues can impact everyone, and at any stage in their career.

Aida Vazin
The mental health expert’s view…

Aida Vazin of GPS Counselor is a qualified therapist who specialises in treating clients remotely. A member of the Association For Electronic Music, Aida’s service enables artists who are touring to continue to get support while on the road. One of the key concerns that emerged from our interviews was stress, which often arises from relentless schedules, travel and a pressure to perform. Here, Aida walks us through the cycles of stress and shares some of her top tips for coping when things get hectic…

“Overwhelmed with so much to do in so little time: Your body needs to decompress and starts craving comfort foods, alcohol, prescription or illicit drugs to switch off. You don’t truly relax because in the back of your mind you are beating yourself up and feel weighed down by the pressure of your responsibilities.

“A high pressure to perform extremely well leads to pushing yourself too hard. You go to bed feeling heavy because your burden is unresolved and you sleep restlessly. You wake up un-refreshed with anxious thoughts, triggering a flood of stress hormones in your body, resulting in emotional and physical symptoms of stress: panic attacks, anxiety, depression, insomnia, fatigue, loss of con dence, foggy thinking, restlessness and stomach problems.

“We just want some relief and get frustrated when we don’t know how to feel better. So, we look for a quick fix, which often leads to substance abuse and addiction. Instead, we can start to incorporate some healthy tools in our lives.”

Talk it out with someone

“A strong support system is an integral part of our lives. Make sure to keep in touch with those you feel safe with and can really relate to.”

Bring back nap time

“Make power naps a part of your daily routine. As little as 15 minutes may make a difference to the quality of your day. Even if you don’t fall asleep, the rest and quiet time can recharge your mind and body.”

Have a daily routine

“Having something that is constant is key to staying mentally strong. For example: no matter where you are, you know that everyday you will take a nap, have lunch, go for a walk. Consistency and routine give our minds ease.”

Dan Mckie
The DJ’s view…

Have you ever had mental health problems that you attribute to your career in electronic music?

“I’ve had many anxiety attacks in my time. I have depression in my family, and a few of my friends suffer from it, but it is nothing to be ashamed of as, if you seek help, you will be surprised who is there for you. Luckily I haven’t suffered from depression, but anxiety can be exhausting and can knock you back for a little while.”

What are the main things that have impacted upon your mental health?

“Because the music industry is so harsh to work in, you deal with rejection, arrogance, egos and brutal emails and messages everyday. This has de nitely impacted on me in the past and present, and probably will in the future — as I’m sure it would anyone.”

Has working in the electronic music industry ever had a negative impact on your personal relationships?

“Yes, from ex-production partners, to artists I managed, to DJs I booked, to clients I’ve worked for and more. I’ve always worked with the motto, ‘It costs nothing to be nice’, but some people when they get power become arses and they don’t realise how their blunt, arrogant emails and messages — or ignoring people — can affect someone, especially when you are trying to open doors, make a career for yourself and get feedback (feedback always helps people progress). I’m not a superstar DJ but people know my labels, my productions, my DJ sets, my music PR company, and just me. Luckily there are a number of people in this industry who I can now call friends. They are the people I respect and look to for advice, and sort of role models. They help to show you a down-to-earth side of the industry.”

Do you think there is a stigma attached to talking about mental health problems in the electronic music industry?

“Maybe some of the big DJs are told to be quiet about their mental health problems, as it might affect their ‘image/brand’. But I think if everyone was open, then there would be less problems and it might have a positive impact on their fans and encourage them to seek help. The more open you are, the less of a burden it is to have a mental health problem.”

What do you do to try and maintain balance and wellbeing?

“I try to turn off from emails, notifications and social media — my phone, basically — when I am not at my desk or studio, especially if I am with my family. It’s healthy to switch off. I like to also catch up with my mates and talk absolute rubbish with a beer, and talk about nothing to do with the business, ha.”

Thijs De Vlieger of Noisia
The producer’s view…

Have you ever had mental health problems that you attribute to your career in electronic music?

“A career in music is very rewarding, but musicians, like many people with regular jobs, are also under a lot of stress. It’s not easy to keep your standards for yourself high, to keep outdoing yourself, to watch out not to ‘lose your edge’ in the public eye. It’s also not easy to find peace, with periods of unproductivity and disappointing creativity. If you make it in this world, people think you’re awesome, which is awesome. But having people think you’re awesome also can make you feel pretty bad when you have yet another disappointing day in the studio.”

What are the main things that have impacted upon your mental health?

“Sleep and travelling. Travelling for a job is stressful. Missing lots of sleep every weekend is bad for the body, and the brain is a part of the body. A lot of DJs have to get a little or completely drunk to deal with mild or more than mild performance anxiety. This also affects sleep quality, so the body and brain don’t regenerate over the weekends.”

Do you think there is a stigma attached to talking about mental health problems in the electronic music industry? 

“There’s a stigma about admitting that it might be a bit too much, because you live the life that everybody wants to live, so you have no right to complain. It’s also pretty hard to admit that the life that you always wanted, that you had to compete so hard for, and that others are always competing with you for, is actually not at all perfect: it’s pretty tough sometimes, and sometimes you need a break from it.”

What do you do to try and maintain balance and wellbeing?

“I see a therapist weekly, even though my problems are small compared to those of others. I see it as periodic maintenance. These things matter so much in life, why would you not talk to someone to nd out if you can make your life a little better? Oh, and if you need alcohol to talk about certain subjects, that is a clear sign your brain is putting up walls around certain topics because they’re too painful to deal with when you’re sober. These things are important. Come back to them when you’re sober. It’ll hurt, but that’s why you’ve been avoiding them, and life will become easier when you understand why.”

Bot
The DJ’s view…

Have you ever had mental health problems that you attribute to your career in electronic music?

“I certainly was challenged when I started touring every weekend. At first I developed a paralysing fear of flying that got so bad I wished we would soon be not doing well in order to stop the touring. Eventually I got over it — after about 10 months of flying, a lot of the panic simply went away. I attribute that to getting used to it by forcing myself to y, but also by learning about how planes actually work. “With all the highs and lows, depression can hit you sometimes, and you nd yourself drinking excessively to cope. It’s also very lonely on the road away from your loved ones. It takes an active effort to make touring bearable. Eventually, with work, it can become a great experience.”

Has working in the electronic music industry ever had a negative impact on your personal relationships?

“I wouldn’t say it had a tangible negative effect on them, but it certainly didn’t help much. Being away on weekends doesn’t exactly help spending quality time with friends and family, who are usually free when I am away working. Luckily I have had a relationship with a wonderful woman for many years and we make our schedules always work well together. I did find it more difficult than expected to establish new meaningful friendships outside of the business because of my schedule.”

Do you think there is a stigma attached to talking about mental health problems in the electronic music industry?

“I believe so. It’s not great for business to go on social media and tell the world how depressed and horrible you are feeling, unfortunately. Usually the image portrayed is one of life-loving, fun-having, party non-stop people, but sometimes that is not the truth. Many people I know have mild to severe mental health issues of some sort. It’s becoming more common to see people share those feelings online and actually get help and support.”

Harley Moon
The artist/tour manager’s view…

Have you ever had mental health problems that you attribute to your career in electronic music?

“When I first started touring I would get pretty bad anxiety. As a tour manager I was very often paranoid that I would forget some equipment or I would miss an alarm, and it would cause my artist to miss a show. At first I had problems with long-haul flights, and I had anti-anxiety tablets to keep me calm. Just the knowing that I had the prescribed drugs in my bag would help me. I did this for seven years. Now I never take any medication.

“I think sleeping is the biggest issue for people who tour in music. Keeping normal sleep hours is impossible. Nowadays I have realised that my physical health plays a big factor in my mental wellness. Eating well, sleep and exercising are very important in keeping myself strong. I quit smoking and rarely drink alcohol, and it’s made everything a lot better.”

Has working in the electronic music industry ever had a negative impact on your personal relationships?

“Working and touring in the music industry has had a drastic effect on all of my relationships. When I started touring and focusing on my career, I lost a lot of friends. I was working every weekend and was no longer able to go out and socialise like I used to. It also affected my family relationships, as I could no longer make pivotal events, as I was always on the road. Relationships with women were the most complicated of all.

“Some women understand that working in music is a job and a passion, some women just thought I was partying for a living. It’s extremely hard on partners to be dating someone who is rarely home and always out in nightclubs. I found that I missed my partner so much that I got depressed, and eventually learned to kind of switch off. I felt like I had to work 10 times more at relationships than anyone else to maintain relationships. It’s definitely gotten easier in the last five, six years with FaceTime and all the other means of communicating that we have available.”

Do you think there is a stigma attached to talking about mental health problems in the electronic music industry?

“I definitely feel that it’s good that more people are taking it seriously. I would always feel, ‘Who am I to complain?’ I get to travel the world and live this seemingly glamorous life. A lot of us living this life almost feel guilty complaining about anything when the usual reaction is, ‘Stop complaining, you travel the world going to nightclubs’, and to a degree I agreed with them. I felt very lucky to have a job that I loved and the privilege of getting to work with musicians that inspired me. But after 18+ years in dance music I look back at all the sacri ces that I have made, and some of them still make me sad that I missed out on a lot of things in my lifetime. It’s a conflicting feeling, but it’s the relationships that I have lost that are the most irreplaceable.

“Touring with different musicians has allowed me to witness first-hand what some artists go through on the road: vulnerabilities, confidence issues, loneliness, isolation and depression. For the majority it’s not a glamorous job. There needs to be more acceptance that mental health affects people in all walks of life… even us in the music industry.”

Kid Massive
The DJ’s view…

Have you ever had mental health problems that you attribute to your career in electronic music?

“Eight years ago I contracted meningitis, which is an in ammation of the brain tissue. It left me hospitalised for two weeks, blind for four weeks and with a dangerously low-functioning kidney. At that point I was successful on all material counts, with lots of tours, high-pro le releases and signi cant exposure on an international level. I was so focused on my career that I had completely neglected everything else in my life. There was zero work/life balance and I had conscious and unconscious unresolved personal issues that had a big impact too. I slowly realised that the way I was living was affecting me negatively. I was always anxious, stressed, with a constant fear of failing and not living up to the ‘hype’. I’m sure all of this played a big part in enabling the meningitis to take such a fierce hold of me.”

What are the main things that have impacted your mental health?

“Lacking work/life balance, learning to understand that it’s ok to let go and take a day off, not worrying about other people’s opinions with regards to what I was trying to do. For a long time, I would judge my progression as an artist based on other people’s value of me, rather than believing in and trusting my choices.”

Has working in the electronic music industry ever had a negative impact on your personal relationships?

“For the last 20 years, I have been surrounded by some incredibly supportive people, including close friends, partners and family. I believe this is down to what type of person I am rather than, as some people might say, luck. I try and be aware of how my environment impacts on me and change it if needed. It’s harder than it sounds, but the end result of tuning in and listening to yourself means you get all the support you could ever need and are surrounded by people who genuinely care about you and what you do.”

Do you think there is a stigma attached to talking about mental health problems in the electronic music industry?

“For generations it’s been taboo to really talk about and express our emotions, and it’s only recently that things are starting to open up and become more accepted. There are now more and more support initiatives that have started to appear, which is setting the precedent for a future way of thinking.”

What do you do to try and maintain balance and wellbeing?

“After my meningitis experience, which literally broke me down physically and mentally, I learnt that the only way for me to build myself back up was to deal with my problems and face them rather than shy away from them. I regularly take stock of my emotional state of mind through mindfulness, self-awareness and meditation. I believe we all deep down know what is going on, but due to our day-to-day lives lled with noise and distraction, we can’t hear ourselves. Just a simple act, such as giving yourself some alone time, can really benefit and realise your awareness.”

Luke Solomon
The DJ’s view…

Have you ever had mental health problems that you attribute to your career in electronic music?

“Yes, a number of physical and mental issues that are both intrinsically linked. The main issue is that I suffer from travel anxiety, but over the years I have suffered from periods of depression.”

What are the main things that have impacted upon your mental health?

“I think travelling has had the greatest impact on me both physically and mentally. Losing a close friend (Kenny Hawkes), who was my DJ partner, also had a great impact on me mentally.”

Has working in the electronic music industry ever had a negative impact on your personal relationships?

“It’s had its moments, but it’s the one thing I have managed to keep intact with pretty much all of the people I am close to throughout my career.”

Do you think there is a stigma attached to talking about mental health problems in the electronic music industry?

“Yes I do. Kenny’s death was caused by his relationship to dance music and constant touring, and the highs and lows of having a career in the industry. No one ever prepares you for the lows. You think this is a career that will last forever, then you are no longer avour of the month and the gigs get thinner. The impact of this is extreme for different reasons. Not only does it affect your bank balance, but it also affects your ego and your con dence. You question your value and doubt yourself. Much like Kenny, I used alcohol to help me through the low parts — it was a temporary con dence boost.

“I was a lot luckier than Ken, but Ken’s death made me evaluate myself and evaluate my personal career, and in turn forced some decisions I needed to make to help with both my physical and mental situation. It took me years to gure this out on my own, as there is no real support network in place — something I feel like our industry really needs.”

What do you do to try and maintain balance and wellbeing?

“A year after Kenny died, I stopped drinking. This was a major step for me, and led to me addressing my career. I started yoga and Pilates regularly, and this helped me massively. I still suffer from chronic IBS which I think is the result of years on the road and the stress of a very complicated job, but I am definitely one of the lucky ones, so I see this as getting off lightly.”

Samantha Powell
The producer’s view…

Have you ever had mental health problems that you attribute to your career in electronic music?

“Somewhere in my mid-thirties I acquired a sense of fear and anxiety that I don’t think I’d had before. I think the combination of the stress of going through the legal immigration process in the US really puts the fear of God into you, especially when you have carved out a life here. It requires you constantly having to prove and glorify your achievements in your eld, and not to mention the cost of it all. The pressure to maintain a consistent ow of hit records or successful projects is anxiety-causing. Particularly when your very existence in the country you have a life in depends on it.”

What are the main things that have impacted upon your mental health?

“The nancial stresses of being self-employed, trying to plan your responsibilities around royalty payments that only come in four times a year, of which you never know the exact gure until they hit your account. Being a female producer in the music industry is hard and can take its toll, you have to prove and justify your very existence pretty much every time in the studio, meeting or writing session. You are constantly questioned on your technical knowledge, assumptions are made on your abilities and your role in music in general. It can really wear you down if you don’t take the time to work on yourself and surround yourself with supportive people.

“That said, being a female producer has really allowed me to be successful with other female artists. There’s a lot of anxiety among female artists, tons of pressure and they don’t always feel they can open up to the men. Issues as basic as being on your monthly cycle, relationship problems, anxieties over skin or weight, and also insecurities regarding their vocals — all of these things, I’ve been told over and over, are easier to communicate to a woman in the studio. It’s camaraderie, I suppose.”

Has working in the electronic music industry ever had a negative impact on your personal relationships?

“Sometimes. Romantic partners don’t always understand the hours, or they automatically assume that there is the crazy ‘rockstar’ lifestyle going on behind closed doors. When in reality you would like nothing more than a hug and a nap.”

Do you think there is a stigma attached to talking about mental health problems in the electronic music industry? 

“Absolutely. Particularly in the UK. The British feel that therapy is for Americans, and we need to just get a grip and get on with it. ‘Keep calm and carry on’.”

What do you do to try and maintain balance and wellbeing?

“Yoga and meditation are invaluable to me. They keep me focused, calm and also physically healthy. I try to surround myself with like-minded people, authentic friendships are imperative. Everyone needs a support system.”

Steven Braines
The artist manager’s view…

Have you ever had mental health problems that you attribute to your career in electronic music?

“I don’t think I would say I’ve had mental health problems arising just solely from my career. When I first started out, I sofa surfed for about 18 months as I couldn’t afford to rent anyway, and that was very mentally taxing. The uncertainty of where to stay, not sleeping or eating well, belongings scattered around London. It sounds bohemian now that I’m a success, but when you aren’t nomadic by choice it’s tough to keep going. I’m quite an anxious person and the perception that you’re doing well before the money has actually caught up to the image is a very strange one.”

Has working in the electronic music industry ever had a negative impact on your personal relationships?

“It’s definitely impacted at times because of the long hours and travel. When touring with artists I manage like Maya Jane Coles, you might be in a totally new time-zone every day for the best part of a month, with ights and gigs thrown into the mix plus clearing my inbox and calls. It’s very hard to actually communicate via anything other than text sometimes. Also, there’s a lot of births, deaths and marriages that you miss too. I’ve de nitely seen some of my relationships break up because they didn’t see enough of me.”

Do you think there is a stigma attached to talking about mental health problems in the electronic music industry?

“I champion mental health in the Music Managers Forum. I’m a qualified psychologist and my mum works in mental health, so I like to get people talking about it. When you do, you find a lot of people have been suffering in silence. A lot of managers, for example, have to deal with a wider range of novel problems and offer a lot of emotional support to others without always receiving it back, and a lot of people leave the industry because of it. It’s been a bit of a watershed moment in mental health recognition in our industry, with helplines being set up and more industry-specific mental health practitioners, which can only be a good thing. Luckily I’ve never been a drinker or into drugs, but I’ve sadly seen a lot of people in the industry fall into addiction because there’s so much temptation around, and not everyone is able to set boundaries for themselves in the face of it.”

What do you do to try and maintain balance and wellbeing?

“I’ve always done Reiki since I was about 16. I first got attuned when I was about 20. I also sauna and steam at least once a week. In our company, we definitely always encourage people to talk about their problems, to take time off for personal reasons if they need it, to be flexible in where and how they work, and make sure that people realise it’s okay to make a mistake. If I feel stressed, I tend to write poems or paint a picture and deal with it creatively.”

Coco Cole
The DJ’s view…

Have you ever had mental health problems that you attribute to your career in electronic music?

“I have periods of anxiety and panic attacks, and it’s almost always when I am very busy with my job, am neglecting social stresses and have a bundle of deadlines and little time to myself.”

What are the main things that have impacted upon your mental health?

“My worst period was definitely in the last year of my three years of doing overnights on the radio among daytime shows, DJing and partying. Five nights a week I would go to sleep between 9-11pm (and wake up every hour through panic of missing my alarm), then wake up at 1.30am. I was on air from 3-6am, then I’d go home and sleep from 8am-12pm, then wake up and work on admin, plan my radio show and repeat. It was constant work and exhaustion. I had one night off and would drink and go out, because I needed the release. I was of course drinking coffee constantly to keep functioning, too. After two years it started to really affect my physical and mental health. I got anxiety and the panic attacks kicked in.

“Usually now, I know that an anxiety period is about to kick in. You can obviously do all the things to try and avoid it, like maintaining a healthy lifestyle and trying to stay calm, but I think they will always happen and you just have to ride them out and give yourself the break and time you need to do that.”

Has working in the electronic music industry ever had a negative impact on your personal relationships?

“Every romantic relationship has ended ultimately because of my schedule and dedication to my job. My friends luckily are more understanding, and work in similar creative elds, so they’re all tight and we all support and love each other and often talk a lot about our mental health.”

Do you think there is a stigma attached to talking about mental health problems in the electronic music industry? 

“I think more and more people are talking now, which is fantastic. What there is still a stigma about, though, is letting people take the actual time to address their mental health. We need to work on accepting people’s different ways of looking after themselves by allowing them to take time off, say no and to come back from that without judgements or a negative impact on their career.”

What do you do to try and maintain balance and wellbeing?

“I am terrible at self-care. But since autumn, on days I’m not DJing, going out or travelling, I’ve been putting myself into bed before 12, waking up earlier and giving myself a schedule. The mini wins of ticking off an accomplishment keeps the ‘you’re not doing enough’ gremlins at bay. I’m having one day a week where I don’t work, and have been doing a few more hobbies outside of my job.”

Events Festival

Here is your ultimate party guide to EDC Week 2018

18/05/2018
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Here’s your itinerary for an entire week’s worth of unmissable pool parties, club nights and day soirées taking over the Las Vegas Strip during this year’s EDC Week…

EDC LAS VEGAS
Where: Las Vegas Motor Speedway
When: Friday 18th – Sunday 20th

It’s the whole reason we’re all here in the first place! EDC Las Vegas has solidified its place as the top electronic festival destination in North America via its world-class production and immersive environment. EDC celebrates 22 years this month with earlier festival dates, to beat the Vegas sun, and a massive line-up featuring more than 250 artists like Armin van Buuren, Diplo, Eric Prydz, Mija, Boys Noize, Afrojack and current cover star, Alan Walker.

Tickets

HAKKASAN
Where: MGM Grand Hotel & Casino
When: Wednesday 16th – Sunday 20th

This world-class venue is the big daddy of Las Vegas megaclubs. Boasting 60,000 square feet and enhanced production, Hakkasan this year celebrates its five-year anniversary with an all-out roster for EDC Week including Above & Beyond (16th), Hardwell (17th), Tiësto (18th), Calvin Harris (19th) and a special guest to close out the week (20th).

Tickets

Photo Credit: Rukes

JEWEL

Where: ARIA Resort & Casino
When: Thursday 17th – Monday 21st

JEWEL offers next-level nightlife luxury and clubbing extravagance across its massive space: 24,000 square feet. The club is worth checking out for its titular jewel itself, a heroic circular dome hovering above the dancefloor and illuminated with rings of LED lights. Stay for the music, which includes NGHTMRE (17th), Lil Jon (18th and 21st) and Kaskade (19th).

Tickets


Photo Credit: Mike Kirschbaum 

MARQUEE NIGHTCLUB & DAYCLUB
Where: The Cosmopolitan
When: Wednesday 16th – Monday 21st

This multi-level club has helped revive and reshape Las Vegas nightlife since opening in 2011. It’s home to a state-of-the-art nightclub as well as a gorgeous, recently redone outdoor Dayclub. Both venues feature stacked line-ups. Dayclub roster includes: Gorgon City & CamelPhat (16th); Andrew Rayel, Firebeatz, Sander van Doorn and Sunnery James & Ryan Marciano (17th); Eric Prydz (18th); Dash Berlin (19th); Oliver Heldens (20th) and Lost Frequencies (21st). Nightclub roster includes: DJ Vice (18th), DJ Mustard (19th) and Dash Berlin (21st).

Tickets

Photo Credit: Marquee Nightclub & Dayclub

OMNIA NIGHTCLUB
Where: Caesars Palace
When: Tuesday 15th – Saturday 19th

This behemoth is breathtaking, equipped with an immersive audiovisual experience that’s anchored around a grandiose kinetic chandelier weighing 22,000 pounds and composed of eight concentric circles in addition to lighting effects, video projections and LED strips, making its display ever-changing. Line-up spreads far and wide: Cash Cash (15th), Porter Robinson (DJ Set) (17th), Martin Garrix (18th) and Zedd (19th).

Tickets


Photo Credit: Al Powers of Powers Imagery

XS NIGHTCLUB

Where: Encore Las Vegas
When: Thursday 17th – Monday 21st

A state-of-the-art megaclub, XS is exactly that: Vegas excess to the core. This clubbing giant, which celebrates its nine-year anniversary during EDC Week and Memorial Day weekend this month, features more than 10,000 individual light sources, intricate décor and 170 luxe VIP tables and outdoor cabanas across 40,000 square feet. They’ll need all that space to house this much talent: David Guetta (17th), Kygo (18th), Diplo (19th), Marshmello (20th) and The Chainsmokers (21st).

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Photo Credit: Barbara Kraft

INTRIGUE NIGHTCLUB
Where: Wynn Las Vegas
When: Wednesday 16th – Saturday 19th

Celebrating its two-year anniversary last month, Intrigue offers an intimate design for an equally personal clubbing experience. But don’t confuse that feature with small: At 14,000 square feet, this venue boasts 60 banquette tables, an elevated bottle service experience and a 94-foot waterfall and pyrotechnic fountain show. Big talent here, too: Marshmello (16th), Dillon Francis (18th), Afrojack (19th) and Yellow Claw (23rd).

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Photo Credit: Barbara Kraft

ENCORE BEACH CLUB
Where: Wynn Las Vegas
When: Thursday 17th – Sunday 20th

This desert oasis has come to define Las Vegas poolside partying. It’s 55,000 square feet of tropical vibes via 40-foot palm trees, multi-tiered pools and dozens of private bungalows and cabanas, all topped by a supreme sound system. Daytime parties feature Black Coffee (17th), Alesso (18th), David Guetta (19th) and Major Lazer (20th). Once the sun goes down, the party continues at NightSwim, the club’s nighttime pool party, with Yellow Claw (18th) and RL Grime (19th).

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Photo Credit: Barbara Kraft

WEDNESDAY 16TH

LIQUID POOL
Where: ARIA Resort & Casino
When: Wednesday 16th – Sunday 20th

EDC Week shenanigans officially start here with a series of proper pool parties. The impressive line-up extends to what feels like forever with Elephante (16th), NGHTMRE (17th), Gryffin (18th), Illenium (19th) and Bijou (20th).

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Photo Credit: Tony Tran Photography

THURSDAY 17TH
Basscon Pool Party
Where: Elation Pool | Stratosphere Hotel and Casino

Basscon, Insomniac’s hardstyle/hard dance brand, hosts a neck-snapping, headbanging, foot-stomping daytime pool party with Adrenalize, Dr. Phunk, Dr. Rude, Gammer, Sub Zero Project and Toneshifterz.

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Bassrush Pool Party
Where: Rehab Beach Club | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino

As the first half of their two-part daylong takeover, Bassrush, Insomniac’s bass- and dubstep-centric brand, hosts a daytime pool party with 4B, Dubloadz, Eptic, Habstrakt, Kai Wachi, Kill the Noise and SayMyName. Start your basstastic adventure here.

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Photo Credit: Da Black Swan for Insomniac Events

Bassrush Massive
Where: The Joint | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino

The night then continues at Bassrush Massive, part two of the crew’s bass invasion. This annual bass, dubstep and drum & bass epic gathering has become the go-to party for bass-heads descending unto Vegas. With Borgore, Flux Pavilion, Kai Wachi, Pendulum (DJ Set), Snails and Zeke Beats.

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Photo Credit: Jake West for Insomniac Events

WET REPUBLIC Ultra Pool
Where: MGM Grand Resort & Casino
When: Thursday 17th – Monday 21st

WET REPUBLIC really means it when it says Ultra Pool. Spanning more than 54,000 square feet, this massive oasis merges poolside luxury with advanced audiovisual features. It’s like a floating waterpark festival, especially with this H-U-G-E line-up: Above & Beyond (17th), Kaskade (18th), Tiësto (19th), Martin Garrix (20th) and Armin van Buuren (21st). All events are sold out, except the Tiësto show, but don’t expect that to last too long.

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Photo Credit: Powers Imagery

Dreamstate Presents
Where: Marquee Nightclub | The Cosmopolitan

Since launching in late 2015, Dreamstate, Insomniac’s growing trance brand, has become a world-class festival and event series in its own right. Last year, Dreamstate got its own stage, quantumVALLEY, across all three days of EDC for the first time ever; the crew returns this year, with a new stage design to boot. Ahead of EDC, Dreamstate hosts a trance takeover at Marquee Nightclub with an all-star roster featuring Markus Schulz, Ferry Corsten, Cosmic Gate, Genix and Arkham Knights.

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Factory 93 Presents DARKwater
Where: Encore Beach Club | Wynn Las Vegas

Even within the EDM bombast of Vegas, house- and techno-heads will find solace at DARKwater presented by Factory 93, Insomniac’s dedicated underground brand. Part of Encore Beach Club’s NightSwim nighttime pool party series, DARKwater welcomes a can’t-miss double-header line-up with Jamie Jones and The Black Madonna.

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Photo Credit: Tyler Hill for Insomniac Events

FRIDAY 18TH
Claude VonStroke, Green Velvet
Where: Drai’s Beachclub | The Cromwell

The techno and house wizards play doubles at this daytime throwdown, where they’re more than likely to go b2b as Get Real, their side hustle duo. The Dirtybird big boss kicks off his summer residency here during EDC Week.

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Knee Deep In Vegas
Where: DAYLIGHT Beach Club | Mandalay Bay

Hot Since 82 hosts a special edition of his Knee Deep event series with underground legend Doc Martin and badass Lauren Lane.

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Photo Credit: Knee Deep In Sound

Brownies & Lemonade Las Vegas
Where: Rehab Beach Club | Hard Rock Hotel & Casino

L.A. ruckus crew Brownies & Lemonade hosts a daytime function that promises secret guests and b2b sets all day. The B&L squad always brings the top talent bubbling up from the future underground, so expect this one to go off — big time.

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Photo Credit: Quasar Media

SATURDAY 19TH
Zeds Dead, Snails, 4B

Where: Drai’s Beachclub | The Cromwell

A triple-stacked bass onslaught with three of the heaviest acts in the game.

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Photo Credit: Montana Martz

Duke Dumont
Where: DAYLIGHT Beach Club | Mandalay Bay

Nothing beats Duke Dumont’s house and deep house vibes while splashing around a pristine pool. Nothing!

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Photo Credit: Patrick Rohl from YeahSure

SUNDAY 20TH
Fool’s Gold
Where: Drai’s Beachclub | The Cromwell

Fool’s Gold head honcho and #RealDJing champion A-Trak hosts a label party alongside the imprint’s first ladies, Anna Lunoe and Kittens.

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Kittens

MONDAY 21ST
Area10 With MK
Where: Drai’s Beachclub | The Cromwell

House legend MK brings his revered Area 10 imprint and party brand to Sin City alongside best friends and house homies CamelPhat, Solardo and Will Clarke.

Tickets

Music

Sony and Warner sell over $1billion in Spotify shares

15/05/2018
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Sony and Warner have sold off more than $1billion of shares in Spotify following the music streaming platform’s stock market floatation in April, respectively shedding half ($750million) and 75% ($400million) of their individual investments.

Spotify claims over 70million paid account holders globally, and recently unveiled new functions such as an AI auto-mixing DJ feature and In-Line, which will help collect more insightful metadata on artists to improve user experience.

Both labels were longstanding investors in the subscription service, raising some questions as to the reasoning behind the sales, but concerns regarding Spotify’s future have been dismissed.

“We’re hugely optimistic about the growth of subscription streaming. We know it has only just begun to fulfill its potential for global scale,” Steve Cooper, Warner CEO, told recode. “We fully expect Spotify to continue to play a major role in that growth.”

Some of the revenue generated from the sales will be distributed amongst artists, although percentages and recipients have not been confirmed at the time of writing.

Music

Arca reveals $6,450 BDSM-inspired leather headphones

15/05/2018
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Arca has revealed a new line of BDSM-inspired leather headphones, which cost $6,450 ($US) a pair.

The experimental electronic music producer has unveiled the Tormenta Cage Headphone Head Piece, which looks like a cage-styled headpiece and comes in structured buffed leather in black. The design features “studded detailing throughout,” integrated over-the-ear headphones with suede-covered cushioned ear pads, “D-ring hardware at face” and “twin adjustable post-stud fastenings at collar.”

Created in collaboration with London-based leather company Fleet Ilya and available exclusively at Canadian luxury fashion retailer SSENSE, the headphone line is being sold “exclusively as an art object” and without any guarantees or warranty, according to the SSENSE website.

Arca announced the headphone line via Instagram with a cheeky caption that read, “hey i designed some headphones it’s casual they’re really cheap pick up a pair or don’t or whatever either way i’m locking you into the sound.” 

In addition to the headphones, Arca has also collaborated with SSENSE on a “capsule collection” of Prada clothing, which includes a $770 ($US) fanny pack.

Last year, Arca released his self-titled album and co-produced Björk’s ninth studio album, ‘Utopia’.

Check out photos of Arca’s Tormenta Cage Headphone Head Piece line below.

 

Skye News

Skye Energy Drink Safe Coaster Coming Soon…..

06/05/2018
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When it comes to date rape drugs, which can be odorless and colorless, it makes perfect sense to have Drink Safe Technologies date rape detection product. Victims who become helpless once they consume the drugged drink.  The amnesic effect allows the perpetrators to rob, rape, or otherwise harm the victim without the victim being able to remember exactly what happened, but the reminders can last for years.

The standard Skye Energy Drink Safe Coaster is a two test device. Measuring 4” x 4” with five-color graphics. The coasters are designed with the drink safe message prominently displayed in the center with two test areas located at each bottom corner. The back of the coaster has complete instructions for use.